ELY'S TEMPERATURE GAIN STUDY

A SCIENCE ACTIVITY SUGGESTED BY MR. C. HOOKER

7TH GRADE SCIENCE, NORTH MIDDLE SCHOOL, KIRKWOOD R-7 SCHOOL DISTRICT

CLICK ON ANY PICTURE TO GO TO MORE INFORMATION ON EACH STEP OF THAT ACTIVITY.
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In Ely's science class temperature gain studies for a chilled aluminum can of soda pop were conducted using a thermometer reading at the start and again twelve minutes later. Students competed for the best insulator.

Ely's home study used a temperature probe with an interface data collector connected to a computer. The information collected was recorded in table and graph formats.

Temperature change with a paper bag insulator can be determined from Ely's computer screen picture by using the table or graph. The time units are minutes and the temperature units are degrees Celsius, C. Degrees Fahrenheit, F, is another temperature scale. The relationship between these scales is given by: C = (5/9)(F - 32). Temperature change is directional. An increase in temperature is the negative of a decrease. So a negative temperature loss would be a temperature gain.

Better Insulation For An Aluminum Can Of Soda Pop:

Science 7th Grade Projected Experiment Science 7th Grade Projected Experiment Science 7th Grade Projected Experiment Science 7th Grade Projected Experiment We constructed a new insolated bag as demonstrated in these pictures then chilled another aluminum can of soda pop and collected data. The results were much better than with a just a paper bag. Ely took both to his science class.


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TEMP Projects:

1. The data table from this study can be used to conduct your analysis. Click on data to get a text list. Use a TI 83 or computer software to curve fit and graph the data and your curve on the same graph paper. Write a few comments on what your information means and provides.

2. (Your Mr. C. Hooker's Type Project) Arrange your class contest to see how well you can insulate an aluminum can of soda pop from temperature changes. Set the rules and guideline of your contest first. Will you measure temperature loss or gain? How many students in each group (one to four)? What materials can be used? What software or calculator will be the standard? ... Compare your equations from a curve fit. Do the questions below to get an idea of temperature relationships and some inspiration for the parameters of your contest.


Questions:

1. What is your temperature in degrees Celsius, C and in degrees Fahrenheit, F? How did you measure your temperature? How did you find the other temperature scale value.

2. Determine the room temperature from some of the graphs on this page in degrees Celsius, C and in degrees Fahrenheit, F.

3. Is temperature loss (gain) different or about the same for different starting points or intervals? How can you tell?

4. Argue with your class about the straight line graph (or data) look of Ely's plain paper bag study versus his double paper bag paper wad study. Put your arguments in writing.


Temperature Loss Project Picture Gallery

The following was used for this educational work:

VERNIER LabPro TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT EQUIPMENT AND SOFTWARE


Other Math Problems and Projects.

Copyright © 2004 with all rights reserved by William V. Thayer, PedLog